Bryan Eneas

The first roundtable meeting of its kind to discuss systemic issues from Prince Albert to La Loche.
The first roundtable meeting of its kind to discuss systemic issues from Prince Albert to La Loche. Bryan Eneas/paNOW Staff

Roundtable meeting addresses ‘crisis’ situation in northern communities

By Bryan Eneas
July 15, 2016 - 12:41pm

Nothing’s changed in La Loche since the shootings in January of 2016.

This is the mentality of locals in the town, who, deciding to do something about it, contacted Prince Albert resident John Hanikenne. Hanikenne told these concerned individuals, he could help.

A woman's jingle dress dancer during the 5th annual James Smith Cree Nation Traditional Powwow. The jingles on the dress are traditionally made of tobacco tin lids.
A woman's jingle dress dancer during the 5th annual James Smith Cree Nation Traditional Powwow. The jingles on the dress are traditionally made of tobacco tin lids. Bryan Eneas/paNOW Staff

J.S.C.N traditional powwow honours youth

By Bryan Eneas
July 9, 2016 - 8:41am

In the early 1900s there was a major push to put an outright ban on powwow gatherings across Canada, and in the mid-50s that ban was lifted allowing First Nations to gather where and when they wanted.

Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Grand Chief Bobby Cameron says closing the existing education gap between non-First Nation and First Nation people is an important priority for his organization.
Federation of Sovereign Indigenous Nations Grand Chief Bobby Cameron says closing the existing education gap between non-First Nation and First Nation people is an important priority for his organization. Bryan Eneas/paNOW Staff

'Unfortunately, we struggle:' Sask. First Nations reflect on education gap

By Bryan Eneas
July 6, 2016 - 12:31pm

Students attending First Nation schools receive roughly half the funding their peers in provincially funded ones do. Chronic underfunding is not only to blame, but according to Saskatchewan First Nations, so is an old, archaic system of institutionalized racism.

The commemorative walk for residential school survivors and those who could not make it home was the brainchild of both Sallie McLeod and Nancy Mirasty. The pair met at the Prince Albert Indian Residential School and have been lifelong friends ever since.
The commemorative walk for residential school survivors and those who could not make it home was the brainchild of both Sallie McLeod and Nancy Mirasty. The pair met at the Prince Albert Indian Residential School and have been lifelong friends ever since. Bryan Eneas/paNOW Staff

Residential school survivors make the walk back home

By Bryan Eneas
June 27, 2016 - 12:00pm

A group of residential school survivors can finally begin the healing process and reflect on a journey which took them by foot from Prince Albert to Stanley Mission.

Donie Roberts is a residential school survivor and participant in the walk for Residential School survivors. Roberts is one of ten walkers who walked four days in a row to reach La Ronge, his hometown. Roberts said he was walking for his friend who commited suicide while he was still attending residential schools, and his family who could not make it home.
Donie Roberts is a residential school survivor and participant in the walk for Residential School survivors. Roberts is one of ten walkers who walked four days in a row to reach La Ronge, his hometown. Roberts said he was walking for his friend who commited suicide while he was still attending residential schools, and his family who could not make it home. Bryan Eneas/paNOW Staff

Commemorative walkers return home to feast

By Bryan Eneas
June 26, 2016 - 9:06am

The Residential School system created a dynamic rift between children, parents and even grandparents.

On Saturday, June 25, some of the victims of residential schools made it home to their families and for their families, on their own accord.

Megan Kyryluk and Rebecca James carry a sign memorializing Danielle Nyland, their close friend who was found dead just over a year ago under suspicious circumstances according to the RCMP. James says that walks like these need to happen to raise more awareness about what needs to be done for missing and murdered women.
Megan Kyryluk and Rebecca James carry a sign memorializing Danielle Nyland, their close friend who was found dead just over a year ago under suspicious circumstances according to the RCMP. James says that walks like these need to happen to raise more awareness about what needs to be done for missing and murdered women. Bryan Eneas/paNOW Staff

Missing and murdered Aboriginal people memorialized on walk

By Bryan Eneas
June 23, 2016 - 5:14pm

Over half a year ago, the federal government launched an inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women.

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