Public hearings to begin for those seeking STC routes

By Sarah Mills/CJME News Staff
June 5, 2017 - 2:35pm

The Saskatchewan Highway Traffic Board (HTB) will begin public hearings Tuesday for the private companies that have applied to run passenger bus services in the province.

The hearings are being held because several notices of opposition have been filed to the applications. 

One of them is from lawyer Larry Kowalchuk who has represented the Saskatchewan Federation of Labour.

"STC offered $15, one-way, anywhere they wanted to go in Saskatchewan, they do that every year, that service is not going to be available by any private company," Kowalchuk told Gormley.

Kowalchuk is arguing at the hearing that both the constitution and the Crown Corporation Public Ownership Act were violated when the government decided to close Saskatchewan Transportation Company (STC). 

"Section 36 of the Constitution states, governments, federal and provincial are committed to providing necessary services, of reasonable quality to all citizens," Kowalchuk argued.

Similar arguments were heard in court when the Amalgamated Transit Union sought a temporary injunction to stop the closure. Representatives for the ATU have also filed notices of opposition. 

Carpe Diem has withdrawn its application citing such opposition, but others, like Di-Cal, want the process done, having already been delayed in launching service.

The hearing for Di-Cal is set for Tuesday in Regina while a hearing for Rider Express Transportation is scheduled for June 8.

The HTB has a 21-day period after the hearings in which to make a decision.

 

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Twitter @smillsSK

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